To start afresh in the New Year: Tips for when talking to a foreigner + (teensy)UPDATE

One thing I’ve come across a lot when talking to  foreigner who doesn’t know much English or only knows basic English or…in fact any non-native English person that doesn’t have THAT much contact with us native Englishmen/women is the confusion about certain phrases we may subconsciously come out with.

Simple phrases that we use in everyday lingo such as ‘How come?’, ‘What’s up?’ and ‘OH ffs…’ are just weird to them. ‘How come?’ means ‘Why?’ in a casual manner and it most likely derives from the phrase ‘How did that come about?’

We know what it means, we’ve always known what it means, it’s just a phrase we come out with when we’re in conversation however, non-natives, especially those outside of Europe, will most likely not understand what ‘How come?’ means. The words ‘how’ and ‘come’ are two different things, and, well, let’s think about it. Putting these two words together with their original definitions does not logically equal the question ‘why?’

Phrases like this can make speaking to some foreigners slightly difficult so sometimes it’s best to be aware of why they may not understand you. I’m not however saying phrases such as ‘How come?’ and ‘What’s up?’ and the sarcastic phrase ‘Well NOOOOO….’ should be avoided. We should still speak normally, it’s how they learn. They ask what we mean, we explain, they gain extra vocab. It’s good practice. All we should do is be aware of what we’re saying!

On another quick note, as you can see I’ve gone through a lil’ blog refurbishment. I’d been meaning to create a personalised background for a couple of months now and finally drew moi! The actual layout of my blog has changed as well just because I can’t change the colour of the text or title text on my blog as I have to pay (meh) and because it was white it wouldn’t show up with my preferred background. I will switch back to my old layout probably is I ever pay or find a way around it but for now it’s this lovely layout! (: Hope it’s not  too different!

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Japanese Phrase Book – The Easy Interpreter

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Helluuu! I am back from camping and, yes, the post on androgyny will be up soon but since I only got back today I am absolutely shot at, therefore, it will be a few more days before I upload the post. It’s 22:39 and my eyes are like ‘let meh slep’ but I’m like ‘NO!’ This is of course going to be a post related to Japanese if you hadn’t already guessed from the photo above. Yesterday afternoon whilst camping my mum came back from a walk to a nearby village with her friend we were camping with whilst they left us to ‘tent-sit’ (i.e. sleep for 2 and a half hours). She had bought me this book she’d found in Oxfam, we love our charity shops, and said she’d found it for 99p. My god it’s good!

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This is the back of the book which is just the blurb, have a read.

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They have a ‘How To Use This Book’ section right at the beginning which is always helpful if you want to get the best out of it. It covers basic pronunciation and info on how the phrases/words are set out and politeness.

023 What the contents looks like. There is of course also an index.

026 Basically just an example of what the start of each chapter looks like. This is chapter 2 which covers anything you may need to know in Japanese in order to converse sufficiently before, during an after a plane journey.

027 Finally, this is an example of the next page which is the main part. The first column is the English word or phrase, the second is the word or phrase in Romanization and the third column is the word or phrase written in Japanese. It is set out like this for all chapters and a lot of these pages may have extra little notes at the bottom of word endings or how polite something is etc etc.

This book is really interesting. I stayed inside the tent for about an hour and a half just flicking through it, it’s not designed to help you become fluent in Japanese whatsoever it’s just designed to assist you in surviving certain situations and understanding what people are saying to you in Japanese. It’s more about travelling around in Japan so for people who are tourists, tour guides or anyone who works and travels in Japan but doesn’t know much Japanese at all, this book is great to quickly whip out and assist you.  It’s called ‘The Easy Interpreter’ by Yoko Pinkerton and Masumi Hiraga.

Awesome. NOW, who likes my nails?

028 I wanted something free and happy to look at,  especially after camping in the rainy valley,so the sky and a bumble bee sounded nice! Yep, I did get this from Bubzbeauty! Na-night!